This is the first day of my life...

showslow:

Zander Olsen, Tree,Line.

This is an ongoing series of constructed photographs rooted in the forest. These works, carried out in Surrey, Hampshire and Wales,involve site specific interventions in the landscape, ‘wrapping’ trees with white material to construct a visual relationship between tree, not-tree and the line of horizon according to the camera’s viewpoint.

(Source: showslow)

— 1 month ago with 74592 notes
paradelle:

lastrealindians:

Inuit children at boarding school. The sign on the wall behind them reads, “Please do not speak Eskimo.” (1914)

This reminds me of how whole sects of complex Inuktitut dialects were wiped out by Euro settlers. There were hundreds of different and diverse dialects in Canadian Inuktitut languages alone, and a chunk of that was wiped out during early 20th century. That language is already on the brink of collapse (only 35,000 or so now loosely speak it).
They also took away not just their language, but their surnames, and replaced them with ID-numbers. As if taking their children and capturing them into residential schools (where they were systematically gaslighted, sexually abused and experimented on the regular) wasn’t enough, an Inuit child’s name was legit changed to something like “Annie E7-121.”

paradelle:

lastrealindians:

Inuit children at boarding school. The sign on the wall behind them reads, “Please do not speak Eskimo.” (1914)

This reminds me of how whole sects of complex Inuktitut dialects were wiped out by Euro settlers. There were hundreds of different and diverse dialects in Canadian Inuktitut languages alone, and a chunk of that was wiped out during early 20th century. That language is already on the brink of collapse (only 35,000 or so now loosely speak it).

They also took away not just their language, but their surnames, and replaced them with ID-numbers. As if taking their children and capturing them into residential schools (where they were systematically gaslighted, sexually abused and experimented on the regular) wasn’t enough, an Inuit child’s name was legit changed to something like “Annie E7-121.”

(via karonhiake)

— 1 month ago with 9454 notes
visitheworld:

One of the most impressive impact craters on Earth, Pingualuit Crater in Ungava Peninsula / Canada (via aventureskangiqsujuaq).

visitheworld:

One of the most impressive impact craters on Earth, Pingualuit Crater in Ungava Peninsula / Canada (via aventureskangiqsujuaq).

(via karonhiake)

— 1 month ago with 6899 notes
heaveninawildflower:

Porthetria dispar; Psilura monacha; Orgyia antiqua; Orgyia gonostigma; Dasychira fascelina; Dasychira pudibunda; Demas coryli (1845)
British Moths and their Transformations. Volume I 1] by Henry Noel Humphreys and John Obadiah Westwood.
Image and text via Wikimedia

heaveninawildflower:

Porthetria dispar; Psilura monacha; Orgyia antiqua; Orgyia gonostigma; Dasychira fascelina; Dasychira pudibunda; Demas coryli (1845)

British Moths and their Transformations. Volume I 1] by Henry Noel Humphreys and John Obadiah Westwood.

Image and text via Wikimedia

— 2 months ago with 189 notes

dynamicafrica:

Art - Diaspora: “African Diva Project" by Margaret Rose Vendreyes.

If any of the above images look in any way familiar, that’s because these artworks are based on some of the most iconic album covers from some of the greatest black women artists of the 20th century.

From Betty Davis and Tina Turner, to Grace Jones and Nina Simone, this series by Jamaican-born Vendreyes includes 33 paintings modeled after a 12” LP full-figure portrait of a black woman soloist. What makes this project stand out, however, is not simply the homage to these legendary women, but the masks that each woman wears. Named after specific African ethnic groups such as Malinke, Ibibio, Kwele and Yoruba, Vendreyes combines the beauty and power of these women with the same characteristics in these masks, “replacing their psychological mask with a literal one”.

This symbolic gesture also plays on the fact that in many African societies, although these masks may be of female ancestors and deities, they are only worn and performed by men during masquerades. 

What are your thoughts on this series?

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

All Africa, All the time.

(via deedwyerart)

— 2 months ago with 979 notes
"The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them."
Ernest Hemingway (via lazyyogi)

(Source: lazyyogi, via aunatural)

— 2 months ago with 1550 notes